Reports & Studies

LINKS FOR ASSESSING THE RISK OF A COSTLY CRASH

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2016

Bureau of Labor Statistics concludes that roadway crashes are the leading cause of occupational fatalities in the U.S. This collection of statistics Includes fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and fatal occupational injuries by occupation and event or exposure for the United States.

National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2016

National CFOI 2016 (Interactive charts)

Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes to Employers

Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS), 2015

This report summarizes the costs incurred by employers. It concludes that traffic safety programs are an alternative to reduce health care expenses to employers without reducing the benefits offered to employees. Protecting employees from motor vehicle crash injury can be a profitable investment of time and resources.

New Report Shows Traffic Crashes Cost Employers $47.4 Billion In 2013

Cost of Motor Vehicle Crashes to Employers—2015™

Work-Related Roadway Crashes

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), March 2004

Roadway crashes are the leading cause of occupational fatalities in the U.S. This report summarizes trends and characteristics of motor vehicle collisions including workers, industries, vehicles, and drivers.

Work-Related Roadway Crashes on CDC.gov

Work-Related Roadway Crashes – Prevention Strategies for Employees

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), March 2004

Although employers cannot control roadway conditions, they can promote safe driving behavior by providing safety information to workers, provide training to workers, and by setting and enforcing driver safety policies.

Prevention Strategies for Employers on CDC.gov

Work-Related Roadway Crashes – Challenges and Opportunities for Prevention

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), September 2003

The report concludes that preventing work-related roadway crashes requires a multifaceted approach that considers psychosocial factors that influence risk-taking in young drivers; physiological responses to fatigue, highway and vehicle design principles; and onboard vehicle monitoring technology.

Challenges and Opportunities for Prevention on CDC.gov